I spent an inordinate amount of time just updating the books page at this site. It hadn’t been done for about two years – I can finally check this task off the list. It took awhile tracking down related websites for each book, especially Google Books samples, which can be quite large and worthwhile for some books. I also cleaned out older volumes from the listing and updated the recommendations list.

From what I can tell – and please do tell me if I’ve missed anything – beyond API books (OpenGL and DirectX) and the GPU Pro series, there have been very few new graphics books since 2013. The major release has been a new edition of Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice. There was also The CUDA Handbook, which is somewhat graphics related but not strictly so. I also included The HDRI Handbook; even though it’s more a user’s guide, it does have some good bits about the theory of tone mapping and much else, in an area that can use more coverage. I don’t bother listing the many books about Unity 3D, the Unreal Engine, etc., since those truly fall in the area of guides.

Anyway, that’s all until SIGGRAPH, when I can take a look at what else is out there.

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Really, the title says it all, the book GPU Pro 5 is shipping. Sadly, there’s no “Look Inside” for the book on Amazon; I’ll hope they at least put the Table of Contents there. You can find a rough Table of Contents on the CRC site; rough in that you can’t see the number of pages for each article. A few articles are quite lengthy: Physically Base Area Lights is 34 pages long, Hi-Z Screen-Space Cone-Traced Reflections is an incredible 44. The rest are in the 10-20 page range.

You can get a taste of the book at the GPU Pro blog, it has previews of a large number of the articles. At $70 this is not a casual purchase, but if you’re a practitioner and just one article saves you 2 hours, the book’s more than paid for itself.

Me, I was amused to see the following, a model from Morgan McGuire’s high-quality model repository - hey, that’s from our world! (And you thought I was done with Minecraft references here.)

VoxeliaMC

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The short version is go see this page here.

I’m collaborating on a little hobby project with Andrew Glassner. It involves paint spectra, so we were hunting down a spectrometer. We’d heard good things about ColorMunki, though it’s pricey for a hobby project. There’s now even a $40 spectrometer from Public Labs; they’re located a few miles from where I live.

Andrew decided to ask Golden Artist Colors, Inc., if they had spectra available for their paints. Happily, they did and agreed to release these for free, noting that “spectra are spectra”. This saves us a lot of grunt work and expense, which is great. I felt so good about them that I decided to make a page about their dataset so that researchers and developers could also benefit from it.

Golden Artists sample data

Yes, I should weight in about Apple’s Metal announcement, or Google’s Tango smartphone, or talk about Oculus Rift, or Word Lens (which really is cool and free for a short time, so get it now), or something. But, others have said enough on them, so let’s talk about two colors, chartreuse and puce.

I’ve blogged about chartreuse before (and answers here). The gist: it’s a color that a lot of people think they know, but don’t (including myself, once upon a time). Get it fixed in your mind before reading further. I decided to actually make it a tiny part of the Udacity MOOC, asking students about it for fun. 10,450 students responded, and here are the results:

  • 41% said yellow-green
  • 22% said red-orange
  • 19% didn’t know
  • 18% said deep purple

Please use this knowledge for good, or evil. So what about puce? Well, last night I was trying to think about other colors I wasn’t sure about. I know what drab is – that’s the color of commerce, accountancy, and business (hey, I don’t make this stuff up). One I though of was puce (aka, peuce, puse, peuse). I again got it wrong. Also, it turns out this has to be about the most disgusting color name ever – you’ve been warned. It sounds nicer in French, though.

This is a mostly content-free post (you really should see Word Lens, though – it’s like magic), but I should have an interesting color-related announcement next week, if all goes well.

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Andrew Glassner has made an 8 week course about the graphics language Processing. The first half of the course is free; if you find you like it, the second half is just $25. Even if you don’t want to take the course, you should watch the 2.5 minute video at the site – beware, it may change your mind. The video gives a sense of the power of Processing and some of the wonderful things you can do with it. My small bit of experience with the language showed me it’s a nice way to quickly display and fiddle around with all sorts of graphical ideas. While I dabbled for a week, Andrew used it for half a decade and has made some fascinating programs. Any language that can have such a terrible name and still thrive in so many ways definitely has something going for it.

glassner1

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guest post by Patrick Cozzi, @pjcozzi.

This isn’t as crazy as it sounds: WebGL has a chance to become the graphics API of choice for real-time graphics research. Here’s why I think so.

An interactive demo is better than a video.

WebGL allows us to embed demos in a website, like the demo for The Compact YCoCg Frame Buffer by Pavlos Mavridis and Georgios Papaioannou. A demo gives readers a better understanding than a video alone, allows them to reproduce performance results on their hardware, and enables them to experiment with debug views like the demo for WebGL Deferred Shading by Sijie Tian, Yuqin Shao, and me. This is, of course, true for a demo written with any graphics API, but WebGL makes the barrier-to-entry very low; it runs almost everywhere (iOS is still holding back the floodgates) and only requires clicking on a link. Readers and reviewers are much more likely to check it out.

WebGL runs on desktop and mobile.

Android devices now have pretty good support for WebGL. This allows us to write the majority of our demo once and get performance numbers for both desktop and mobile. This is especially useful for algorithms that will have different performance implications due to differences in GPU architectures, e.g., early-z vs. tile-based, or network bandwidth, e.g., streaming massive models.

WebGL is starting to expose modern GPU features.

WebGL is based on OpenGL ES 2.0 so it doesn’t expose features like query timers, compute shaders, uniform buffers, etc. However, with some WebGL 2 (based on ES 3.0) features being exposed as extensions, we are getting access to more GPU features like instancing and multiple render targets. Given that OpenGL ES 3.1 will be released this year with compute shaders, atomics, and image load/store, we can expect WebGL to follow. This will allow compute-shader-based research in WebGL, an area where I expect we’ll continue to see innovation. In addition, with NVIDIA Tegra K1, we see OpenGL 4.4 support on mobile, which could ultimately mean more features exposed by WebGL to keep pace with mobile.

Some graphics research areas, such as animation, don’t always need access to the latest GPU features and instead just need a way to visualization their results. Even many of the latest JCGT papers on rendering can be implemented with WebGL and the extensions it exposes today (e.g., “Weighted Blended Order-Independent Transparency“). On the other hand, some research will explore the latest GPU features or use features only available to languages with pointers, for example, using persistent-mapped buffers in Approaching Zero Driver Overhead by Cass Everitt, Graham Sellers, John McDonald, and Tim Foley.

WebGL is faster to develop with.

Coming from C++, JavaScript takes some getting use to (see An Introduction to JavaScript for Sophisticated Programmers by Morgan McGuire), but it has its benefits: lighting-fast iteration times, lots of open-source third-party libraries, some nice language features such as functions as first-class objects and JSON serialization, and some decent tools. Most people will be more productive in JavaScript than in C++ once up to speed.

JavaScript is not as fast as C++, which is a concern when we are comparing a CPU-bound algorithm to previous work in C++. However, for GPU-bound work, JavaScript and C++ are very similar.

Try it.

Check out the WebGL Report to see what extensions your browser supports. If it meets the needs for your next research project, give it a try!

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Here we go:

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Well, it’s not printed in silver or steel or somesuch, but it’s still fun to see. This is from Alexander Enzmann, who did a lot of work on the SPD model software, outputting a wide variety of formats. Since the spheres in the sphereflake normally touch each other at only one point, he modified the program a bit to push the spheres only 80% of the way along their axis translation, so giving more overlap between each pair. He printed this on his Solidoodle printersphereflake

512 and counting

I noticed I reached a milestone number of postings today, 512 answers posted to the online Intro to 3D Graphics course. Admittedly, some are replies to questions such as “how is your voice so dull?” However, most of the questions are ones that I can chew into. For example, I enjoyed answering this one today, about how diffuse surfaces work. I then start to ramble on about area light sources and how they work, which I think is a really worthwhile way to think about radiance and what’s happening at a pixel. I also like this recent one, about z-fighting, as I talk about the giant headache (and a common solution) that occurs in ray tracing when two transparent materials touch each other.

So the takeaway is that if you ever want to ask me a question and I’m not replying to email, act like you’re a student, find a relevant lesson, and post a question there. Honestly, I’m thoroughly enjoying answering questions on these forums; I get to help people, and for the most part the questions are ones I can actually answer, which is always a nice feeling. Sometimes others will give even better answers and I get to learn something. So go ahead, find some dumb answer of mine and give a better one.

By the way, I finally annotated the syllabus for the class. Now it’s possible to cherry-pick lessons; in particularly, I mark all lessons that are specifically about three.js syntax and methodology if you already know graphics.

alpha

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HPG CFP 2014

Really, you just need this link. I think HPG is the most useful conference I keep tabs on, from a “papers that can help me out” standpoint. SIGGRAPH’s better for a “see what’s happening in the field as a whole” view, and often there’s useful stuff in the courses and sketches, but in the area of papers HPG far outstrips SIGGRAPH in the number of papers directly useful to me. I can’t justify going as often as I like (especially when it’s in Europe), but HPG’s a great conference.

Anyway, here’s the CFP boilerplate, to save your precious fingers from having to click on that link (it’s actually amazing to me how much links are not clicked on; in my own life I tend to consider clicking on a link something of a commitment).

High-Performance Graphics 2014 is the leading international forum for performance-oriented graphics and imaging systems research including innovative algorithms, efficient implementations, languages, parallelism, compilers, hardware and architectures for high-performance graphics. High-Performance Graphics was founded in 2009, synthesizing multiple conferences to bring together researchers, engineers, and architects to discuss the complex interactions of parallel hardware, novel programming models, and efficient algorithms in the design of systems for current and future graphics and visual computing applications.

The conference is co-sponsored by Eurographics and ACM SIGGRAPH. The 2014 program features three days of paper and industry presentations, with ample time for discussions during breaks, lunches, and the conference banquet. It will be co-located with EGSR 2014 in Lyon, France, and will take place on June 23—25, 2014.

Topics include:

  • Hardware and systems for high-performance graphics and visual computing
    • Graphics hardware simulation, optimization, and performance measurement
    • Shading architectures
    • Novel fixed-function hardware design
    • Hardware for accelerating computer
    • Hardware design for mobile, embedded, integrated, and low-power devices
    • Cloud-accelerated graphics systems
    • Novel display technologies
    • Virtual and augmented reality systems
  • High-performance computer vision and image processing techniques
    • High-performance algorithms for computational photography, video, and computer vision
    • Hardware architectures for image and signal processors (ISPs)
    • Performance analysis of computational photography and computer vision applications on parallel architectures, GPUs, and specialized hardware
    • Programming abstractions for graphics
      • Interactive rendering pipelines (hardware or software)
      • Programming models and APIs for graphics, vision, and image processing
      • Shading language design and implementation
      • Compilation techniques for parallel graphics architectures
      • Rendering algorithms
        • Spatial acceleration data structures
        • Surface representations and tessellation algorithms
        • Texturing and compression/decompression algorithms
        • Interactive rendering algorithms (hardware or software)
        • Visibility algorithms (ray tracing, rasterization, transparency, anti-aliasing, …)
        • Illumination algorithms (shadows, global illumination, …)
        • Image sampling strategies and filtering techniques
        • Scalable algorithms for parallel rendering and large data visualization
        • Parallel computing for graphics and visual computing applications
          • Physics and animation
          • Novel applications of GPU computing

Important Dates:

  • Paper submission deadline: April 4, 2014
  • Notification of acceptance: May 12, 2014
  • Camera-ready papers due: May 22, 2014
  • Conference: June 23—25, 2014

More information: www.HighPerformanceGraphics.org

 

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