Miscellaneous

You are currently browsing the archive for the Miscellaneous category.

Last collection of links for awhile – I’m pretty much caught up. Here’s a rundown of things that are more physical:

  • Where’s Waldo in the real world; specifically, Seattle. Info. Some of the Easter Eggs are truly great.
  • Pixelated hair. I collect anything where “X is used as pixels”; link collection here (and send me more).
  • I’m impressed by Google Cardboard. A local architecture firm has been using it to give clients a much better sense of their designs. The fact that you can pre-render at very high quality I consider a large advantage over GPU-based VR. Also, it seems like many firms overbuilt, so these viewers are now dirt cheap, e.g. less than $3 with free shipping.
  • Surroundings:
    • The Ricoh Theta gives surprisingly nice instant IBLs in a relatively cheap ($300) compact camera – gallery, review.
    • Matterport looks like a pretty nice room capture device.
    • Photosynth 3 is strangely compelling at times. On one level it’s a low-frame-count video you can scrub through, but scenes often have a surreal feel as interpolations are shown.
  • Intel Thunderbolt 3 demos, showing a laptop driving an external GPU. Annoying ad will play, but then the chewy bit of the video plays. Too much info about USB & Thunderbolt here.
  • If you have lots of old business cards, two words: Menger Sponge.
  • This Is Colossal covers lots of interesting artistic and well-crafted works. Mostly real-world stuff (I liked this mirror work), and also great things such as Bees & Bombs (example below).

I’ve burnt through most of my SIGGRAPH tidbits. Now to start running through a few worthwhile articles, resources, and sites I’ve found the past months:

  • Colors and words article – a must-read. Teaser: “So he raised his daughter while being careful to never describe the color of the sky to her, and then one day asked her what color she saw when she looked up.”
  • IKEA has been using V-Ray for much of its catalog for years. Favorite quote: “But the real turning point for us was when, in 2009, they called us and said, ‘You have to stop using CG. I’ve got 200 product images and they’re just terrible. You guys need to practise [sic] more.’ So we looked at all the images they said weren’t good enough and the two or three they said were great, and the ones they didn’t like were photography and the good ones were all CG!”
  • Cambridge, Mass. (which I live next to) as a 3D map in your browser. Background info here. WebGL is great.
  • Slightly spooky 3D program, done in CSS (that’s right – no WebGL here). Other fun experiments by the author here.
  • Languages: I hadn’t heard of a few of these C++ tools. The Swift language, which I’ve heard nice things about, is going to be open-sourced by Apple (surprising, for Apple). Michael Gleicher mentioned liking the free book Javascript in 10 Minutes.
  • Tools: For home use only, Glary Utilities is a bunch of free utilities – two minutes to clean off various types of sludge from your PC. Everything is a simple super-fast file and folder name searcher for Windows. I’ve added these to the bottom section of the portal page.
  • Ray tracing using armor stands in Minecraft. Things just keep getting weirder.

Still more things, bits of info worth knowing (at least to me – now I know where I’ve written it all down):

  • glTF is an up and coming format for transmitting 3D models, tailored for WebGL and OpenGL – they like to think of it as a 3D model codec. There’s three.js and Node.js support, as well as a Collada and separate FBX converter. There’s more explanation of glTF in the presentation at the WebGL BOF. Compression progress here, discussion here. (Thanks to Patrick Cozzi for these links.)
  • I mentioned Shadertoy two days ago. I’ll mention it again! I’ve heard Iñigo Quilez’s youtube video channel has good tutorials on programming for Shadertoy, or just watch great demos (with no chance of locking up your GPU). Also, check this great Shadertoy illusion. My theory is every blog post should have a reference to Shadertoy, at least in my perfect world.
  • The code for Epic’s Unreal Engine 4 is all open-sourced now. Best story for me at SIGGRAPH was of a guy who looked like a gang member coming to an Educator’s meeting and getting the signatures of some of the UE4 programmers, as he wanted to thank them for changing his life due to their code being accessible.
  • Unity 4 is also free (including royalty free) for personal use (though not open source). Old news from March and GDC, but I realized I had only tweeted it, not blogged it.
  • 3D printing. Yeah, it’s not graphics, but it’s close enough for me. The Computational Tools for 3D Printing course had a good introduction to the major types of 3D print processes, along with a useful walk down the software pipeline. BTW, I made a little page of links to 3D printing resources for beginners with an URL I can remember, bit.ly/info3dp
  • I was surprised to learn that cross-site scripting attacks are 80% (by some measure) of all website security problems. A form of this type of attack was found and fixed back in summer 2011 for WebGL in Chrome and Firefox, with the concern that private textures from other sites could be read and copied by WebGL programs.
  • Sketchfab has been adding cool new features, such as animation and object annotation (click horizontal arrows in lower right), as well as Oculus Rift support: just put “/embed?oculus=2” at the end of any model URL.

Going for a walk
by Yann
on Sketchfab

Get them: http://skitten.org/2015/07/siggraph-2015-google-calendars

As of this moment it’s missing our own event Sunday, but you’re all coming to that anyway, right? I also believe there are one or two parties not listed, such as the Chapters Party.

Oh, and there’s an informal WebGL meetup Saturday night (tonight!) at the bar by the pool at the Figueroa.

Time to get on the plane – see you there!

Tags: , ,

Why not?

I like to ask researchers whether they think the release of code should be encouraged, if not required, for technical papers. My argument (stolen from somewhere) is, “would you allow someone to publish an analysis of Hamlet but not allow anyone to see Hamlet itself?” The main argument for publishing the code (beyond helping the world as a whole) is that people can check your work, which I hear is a part of this science stuff in “computer science.”
       
Often they’re against it. The two reasons I hear are “my code sucks” and “we’ve patented the technique.” I can also imagine, “I don’t want those commercial fatcats stealing my code,” to which I say, “put some ridiculous license on it, then.” If the reason is, “I want to publish to enhance my resume and reputation, but I also want to keep it all secret because I’m going to make money off it,” then choose A or B, you can’t have both (or shouldn’t, in my Utopian fantasy world).

Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , ,

CFP HPG 2015

I’m being a lazy reporter here, simply passing on the press release. That said, of all the research-oriented gathering out there, this one I find the most relevant to what I do (well, GDC, too, but HPG is better for new ideas, vs. the “proven implementations” seen at GDC). This year the HPG committee is trying to include topics relating to emerging display technologies e.g. virtual and augmented reality.

High Performance Graphics is the leading international forum for performance-oriented graphics and imaging systems research, including innovative algorithms, efficient implementations, languages, parallelism, compilers, hardware and architectures for high-performance graphics. The conference brings together researchers, engineers, and architects to discuss the complex interactions of parallel hardware, novel programming models, and efficient algorithms in the design of systems for current and future graphics and visual computing applications.

High Performance Graphics is co-sponsored by Eurographics and ACM SIGGRAPH. The program features three days of paper and industry presentations, with ample time for discussions during breaks, lunches, and the conference banquet. The conference is co-located with SIGGRAPH 2015 in Los Angeles, United States, and will take place on August 7–9, 2015.

High Performance Graphics invites original and innovative performance-oriented contributions to the design of hardware architectures, programming systems, and algorithms for all areas of graphics, including rendering, virtual and augmented reality, ray tracing, physics, animation, and visual computing. It also invites contributions to the emerging area of high-performance computer vision and image processing for graphics applications. Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Hardware and systems for high-performance graphics and visual computing
    • Graphics hardware simulation, optimization, and performance measurement
    • Shading architectures
    • Novel fixed-function hardware design
    • Hardware design for mobile, embedded, integrated, and low-power devices
    • Cloud-accelerated graphics systems
  • Hardware and software systems for emerging display technologies
    • Novel display technologies
    • Virtual and augmented reality systems
    • Low-latency rendering and high-performance processing of sensor input
    • High-resolution and high-dynamic range displays
  • Real-time and interactive ray tracing hardware or software
    • Spatial acceleration data structures
    • Ray traversal, sorting, and intersection techniques
    • Scheduling and shading for ray tracing
  • High-performance computer vision and image processing techniques
    • Algorithms for computational photography, video, and computer vision
    • Hardware architectures for image and signal processors (ISPs)
    • Performance analysis of computational photography and computer vision applications
  • Programming abstractions for graphics
    • Interactive rendering pipelines (hardware or software)
    • Programming models and APIs for graphics, vision, and image processing
    • Shading language design and implementation
    • Compilation techniques for parallel graphics architectures
  • Rendering algorithms
    • Surface representations and tessellation algorithms
    • Texturing and compression/decompression algorithms
    • Interactive rendering algorithms (hardware or software)
    • Visibility and illumination algorithms (shadows, rasterization, global illumination, …)
    • Image sampling, reconstruction, and filtering techniques
  • Parallel computing for graphics and visual computing applications
    • Physics, sound processing, and animation
    • Large data visualization
    • Novel applications of GPU computing
Important Dates
 Papers
 Friday, April 17  Deadline for paper submissions
 Monday, May 18  Reviews available (start of rebuttal period)
 Thursday, May 21  End of rebuttal period
 Monday, June 1  Notification of paper acceptance
 Thursday, June 11  Revised papers due
 Posters
 Friday, June 5  Deadline for poster submissions
 Friday, June 12  Notification of poster acceptance
 Hot3D
 Friday, June 5  Deadline for Hot3D proposals
 Friday, June 12  Notification of acceptance
 Conference
 Friday—Sunday,
August 7—9
 Conference

 

Full CFP here.

Yes, I should weight in about Apple’s Metal announcement, or Google’s Tango smartphone, or talk about Oculus Rift, or Word Lens (which really is cool and free for a short time, so get it now), or something. But, others have said enough on them, so let’s talk about two colors, chartreuse and puce.

I’ve blogged about chartreuse before (and answers here). The gist: it’s a color that a lot of people think they know, but don’t (including myself, once upon a time). Get it fixed in your mind before reading further. I decided to actually make it a tiny part of the Udacity MOOC, asking students about it for fun. 10,450 students responded, and here are the results:

  • 41% said yellow-green
  • 22% said red-orange
  • 19% didn’t know
  • 18% said deep purple

Please use this knowledge for good, or evil. So what about puce? Well, last night I was trying to think about other colors I wasn’t sure about. I know what drab is – that’s the color of commerce, accountancy, and business (hey, I don’t make this stuff up). One I though of was puce (aka, peuce, puse, peuse). I again got it wrong. Also, it turns out this has to be about the most disgusting color name ever – you’ve been warned. It sounds nicer in French, though.

This is a mostly content-free post (you really should see Word Lens, though – it’s like magic), but I should have an interesting color-related announcement next week, if all goes well.

Tags:

Well, it’s not printed in silver or steel or somesuch, but it’s still fun to see. This is from Alexander Enzmann, who did a lot of work on the SPD model software, outputting a wide variety of formats. Since the spheres in the sphereflake normally touch each other at only one point, he modified the program a bit to push the spheres only 80% of the way along their axis translation, so giving more overlap between each pair. He printed this on his Solidoodle printersphereflake

HPG CFP 2014

Really, you just need this link. I think HPG is the most useful conference I keep tabs on, from a “papers that can help me out” standpoint. SIGGRAPH’s better for a “see what’s happening in the field as a whole” view, and often there’s useful stuff in the courses and sketches, but in the area of papers HPG far outstrips SIGGRAPH in the number of papers directly useful to me. I can’t justify going as often as I like (especially when it’s in Europe), but HPG’s a great conference.

Anyway, here’s the CFP boilerplate, to save your precious fingers from having to click on that link (it’s actually amazing to me how much links are not clicked on; in my own life I tend to consider clicking on a link something of a commitment).

High-Performance Graphics 2014 is the leading international forum for performance-oriented graphics and imaging systems research including innovative algorithms, efficient implementations, languages, parallelism, compilers, hardware and architectures for high-performance graphics. High-Performance Graphics was founded in 2009, synthesizing multiple conferences to bring together researchers, engineers, and architects to discuss the complex interactions of parallel hardware, novel programming models, and efficient algorithms in the design of systems for current and future graphics and visual computing applications.

The conference is co-sponsored by Eurographics and ACM SIGGRAPH. The 2014 program features three days of paper and industry presentations, with ample time for discussions during breaks, lunches, and the conference banquet. It will be co-located with EGSR 2014 in Lyon, France, and will take place on June 23—25, 2014.

Topics include:

  • Hardware and systems for high-performance graphics and visual computing
    • Graphics hardware simulation, optimization, and performance measurement
    • Shading architectures
    • Novel fixed-function hardware design
    • Hardware for accelerating computer
    • Hardware design for mobile, embedded, integrated, and low-power devices
    • Cloud-accelerated graphics systems
    • Novel display technologies
    • Virtual and augmented reality systems
  • High-performance computer vision and image processing techniques
    • High-performance algorithms for computational photography, video, and computer vision
    • Hardware architectures for image and signal processors (ISPs)
    • Performance analysis of computational photography and computer vision applications on parallel architectures, GPUs, and specialized hardware
    • Programming abstractions for graphics
      • Interactive rendering pipelines (hardware or software)
      • Programming models and APIs for graphics, vision, and image processing
      • Shading language design and implementation
      • Compilation techniques for parallel graphics architectures
      • Rendering algorithms
        • Spatial acceleration data structures
        • Surface representations and tessellation algorithms
        • Texturing and compression/decompression algorithms
        • Interactive rendering algorithms (hardware or software)
        • Visibility algorithms (ray tracing, rasterization, transparency, anti-aliasing, …)
        • Illumination algorithms (shadows, global illumination, …)
        • Image sampling strategies and filtering techniques
        • Scalable algorithms for parallel rendering and large data visualization
        • Parallel computing for graphics and visual computing applications
          • Physics and animation
          • Novel applications of GPU computing

Important Dates:

  • Paper submission deadline: April 4, 2014
  • Notification of acceptance: May 12, 2014
  • Camera-ready papers due: May 22, 2014
  • Conference: June 23—25, 2014

More information: www.HighPerformanceGraphics.org

 

I’m about to embark on a 20-hour (or so) plane trip to Shanghai. With most of that time being in the plane, I’m loading up on stuff to read on my iPad. (Tip: GoodReader is great for copying files from your DropBox to your iPad.) JCGT does a great job of helping me fill up. Just go to the “Read” area and there’s a long list of articles, select the ones that sound interesting, and download away (well, having all the papers be called “paper.pdf” is not ideal, but that will eventually get fixed). No messing around with logging in, no digging to find things, just “here’s a nicely-illustrated list, have at it”. It’s amazing to me how much the little illustrations help me quickly trim the search.

In contrast, I had to do a few minutes of clever searching to find the SIGGRAPH 2013 Proceedings. Shame on you, ACM DL, for not responding properly to the searches “SIGGRAPH 2013” or “SIGGRAPH 2013 papers”. The first search shows everything but the papers, since the papers are part of TOG; the second search gives practically random results.

« Older entries