December 2013

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Here are a few cool things I noticed and seem appropriate to post today.

First, this person is doing cool real-life procedural texturing. Or I should say, is really covering up, since we know the aliens are the ones who are really making these.

The Graphics Codex now has three sample PDFs available for free download, to give you a sense of what’s in the app/book. Find the links in the right-hand column.

The Christmas Experiments gives 24 little graphical presents, scroll down to make them appear. I haven’t opened them all up yet, as I was working backward and only got as far as this one, which is lovely and interactive.

Merry
xmas

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With the holidays upon us, it’s time to hack! Well, a little bit. I spent a fair bit of time improving my transforms demo, folding in comments from others and my own ideas. Many thanks to all who sent me suggestions (and anyone’s welcome to send more). I like one subtle feature now: if the blue test point is clipped, it turns red and clipping is also noted in the transforms themselves.

The feature I like the most is that which shows the frustum. Run the demo and select “Show frustum: depths”. Admire that the scene is rendered on the view frustum’s near plane. Rotate the camera around (left mouse) until it’s aligned to a side view of the view frustum. You’ll see the near and far plane depths (colored), and some equally spaced depth planes in between (in terms of NDC and Z-depth values, not in terms of world coordinates).

side

Now play with the near and far plane depths under “Camera manipulation” (open that menu by clicking on the arrow to the left of the word “Camera”). This really shows the effect of moving the near place close to the object, evening out the distribution of the plane depths. Here’s an example:

side2

The mind-bender part of this new viewport feature is that if you rotate the camera, you’re of course rotating the frustum in the opposite direction in the viewport, which holds the view of the scene steady and shows the camera’s movement. My mind is constantly seeing the frustum “inverted”, as it wants both directions to be in the same direction, I think. I even tried modeling the tip where the eye is located, to give a “front” for the eye position, but that doesn’t help much. Probably a fully-modeled eyeball would be a better tipoff, but that’s way more work than I want to put into this.

You can try lots of other things; dolly is done with the mouse wheel (or middle mouse up and down), pan with the right mouse. All the code is downloadable from my github repository.

Click on image for a larger, readable version.

transforms4

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Try it out (you have to have WebGL enabled etc.)

2013-12-19_220205

I made this demo as a few students of the Interactive Graphics MOOC were asking for something showing the various transforms from beginning to end.

It’s not a fantastic demo (yet), but if you roughly understand the pipeline, you can then look at a given point and see how it goes through each transform.

It’s actually kind of a fun puzzle or guessing game, if you understand the transforms: if I pan, what values will change? What if I change the field of view, or the near plane?

I’d love suggestions. I can imagine ways to help guide the user with what various coordinate transforms mean, e.g. putting up a pixel grid and labeling it when just the window coordinates transform is selected, or maybe a second window showing a side view and the frustum (but I’m not sure what I’d put in that window, or what view to use for an arbitrary camera).

I’ve been bumping into limitations of three.js as it is, but I’m on a roll so that’s why I’m asking.

 

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